Archive for September, 2007

Awareness

The event is nothing;The respond is everything.

We do have a choice;

We can’t change the event but we can change our perception.

An event is always in the past tense. Do we want to live the past? It’s gone. That event coming back will not be exactly the same. Just like water in a flowing river, that water will never ever be the same. Do we want to expand our energies in an event that has already gone past for good? An anger, an irritation, a frustration, a sadness, a guilt, a fear.

Making a choice is being in the “Presence”. Being in “Now”. Letting the Past go. Releasing it. Finding a closure. Forgiving. Our life’s meant to be a joyful journey. We’re all here to live. Forgiving and releasing what has just pasted is the beginning to be aware of our Being.

Being in the Presence. Being in Now.

Similar to being in a relationship. Many of us during the times when we’re being with our parents, spouses, friends or children, we’re in a state of drifted lost. We’re not being aware of the joy of those connections. Our daily pressures and demand distant us from enjoying those connections. We tend to be lost in enjoying those relationships. We’re lost in our own thoughts while being with them. We aren’t being in an Aware state. We’re not in the flow. We’re being around our relationships for the sake of just being around. How often do we enjoy everyone single moment when we’re being around them. It’s not the amount time that we spent being with them. It’s about the quality time, although it might be for just a few minutes. If each of those minutes is a joy to both parties, those moments were not lost.

Just like when we fall in love, each moment is a blissful romantic moment. We’re in the flow; we’re being in absolute awareness; we’re being in absolute presence.

Think about this story…

A king was once asked by a man, “how can you be in a state of constant awareness. You’ve all the richness to corrupt you, to spoil you. You’ve the power to distract you“.

The king replied, “why not. Let me show you. Now carry this hot pot of oil on your head and never spill a drop. Follow me for a stroll beyond the gates of my palace“.

The king and the man walked past busy streets filled with aromas, sounds of music, whispers, snake charmers and beautiful women.

Having returning to the palace after the walk, the king asked the man, “now relate to me what you’d heard, the smell, things you’ve seen and felt “.

The man replied, “how could I’ve done any of those. I was concentrating on making sure the pot of oil was steadily balanced on my head“.

The king replied, “there you go. You’re in an absolute state of bliss. In total awareness and nothing else in important. You’re in the Presence. The events around you didn’t matter at all. You’re totally absorb with the moments while the pot of oil was on your head“.

Just like

– each breathe that we take, it’s a new breathe. We chose to enjoy that new breathe or treat it as just another breathe. “If it is to be, it is up to me“.Make that choice NOW.

Beauty of Math!

1 x 8 + 1 = 9
12 x 8 + 2 = 98
123 x 8 + 3 = 987
1234 x 8 + 4 = 9876
12345 x 8 + 5 = 98765
123456 x 8 + 6 = 987654
1234567 x 8 + 7 = 9876543
12345678 x 8 + 8 = 98765432
123456789 x 8 + 9 = 987654321

1 x 9 + 2 = 11
12 x 9 + 3 = 111
123 x 9 + 4 = 1111
1234 x 9 + 5 = 11111
12345 x 9 + 6 = 111111
123456 x 9 + 7 = 1111111
1234567 x 9 + 8 = 11111111
12345678 x 9 + 9 = 111111111
123456789 x 9 +10= 1111111111

9 x 9 + 7 = 88
98 x 9 + 6 = 888
987 x 9 + 5 = 8888
9876 x 9 + 4 = 88888
98765 x 9 + 3 = 888888
987654 x 9 + 2 = 8888888
9876543 x 9 + 1 = 88888888
98765432 x 9 + 0 = 888888888

Brilliant, isn’t it?
And look at this symmetry:
1 x 1 = 1
11 x 11 = 121
111 x 111 = 12321
1111 x 1111 = 1234321
11111 x 11111 = 123454321
111111 x 111111 = 12345654321
1111111 x 1111111 = 1234567654321
11111111 x 11111111 = 123456787654321
111111111 x 111111111 345678987654321

Now, take a look at this…

101%

From a strictly mathematical viewpoint:

What Equals 100%? What does it mean to give MORE than 100%?
Ever wonder about those people who say they are giving more than 100%?
We have all been in situations where someone wants you to GIVE OVER 100%.
How about ACHIEVING 101%?

What equals 100% in life?

Here’s a little mathematical formula that might help answer these questions:

If:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Is represented as:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26.

If:
H-A-R-D-W-O-R- K
8+1+18+4+23+15+18+11 = 98%

And:
K-N-O-W-L-E-D-G-E
11+14+15+23+12+5+4+7+5 = 96%

But:
A-T-T-I-T-U-D-E
1+20+20+9+20+21+4+5 = 100%

THEN, look how far the love of God will take you:

L-O-V-E-O-F-G-O-D
12+15+22+5+15+6+7+15+4 = 101%
Therefore, one can conclude with mathematical certainty that:
While Hard Work and Knowledge will get you close, and Attitude will get you there, It’s the Love of God that will put you over the top!

Let’s discuss about these two words today.

Patience.

 

Tolerance.

 

Patience is – the ability to endure waiting, delay, or provocation without becoming annoyed or upset, or to persevere calmly when faced with difficulties.

Tolerance (Toleration) is a term used in social, cultural and religious contexts to describe attitudes and practices that prohibit discrimination against those whose practices or group memberships may be disapproved of by those in the majority. Though developed to refer to the religious toleration of minority religious sects following the Protestant Reformation, these terms are increasingly used to refer to a wider range of tolerated practices and groups, such as the toleration of sexual practices and orientations, or of political parties or ideas widely considered objectionable.

 

The principle of toleration is controversial. Liberal critics may see in it an inappropriate implication that the “tolerated” custom or behavior is an aberration or that authorities have a right to punish difference; such critics may instead emphasize notions such as civility or pluralism. Other critics, some sympathetic to traditional fundamentalism, condemn toleration as a form of moral relativism. On the other hand, defenders of toleration may define it as involving positive regard for difference or, alternately, may regard a narrow definition of the term as more specific and useful than its proposed alternatives, since it does not require false expression of enthusiasm for groups or practices that are genuinely disapproved of.

Now…these words have been referred to as virtues to have. I would like to offer another point of view. These two seemingly virtues are to me “Struggles”. Why?

Patience and Tolerance provoke a negative feeling. And inner struggle.

 

I know he is late but I’ll be patient. I’ll endure this habit of his of always being late.

 

He makes me angry but I will tolerate this anger. I’ll not lose my patience.

 

The society is tolerant of the minority.

 

These words have negative energies. By being tolerant and patient, the acts themselves sap us of our inner energies. Being in these states, adopting these mental states and behaviors, we’ll have to struggle with our feelings, our inner representations, our sub-modalites.

 

We create “Parts” within us that we might not even know. These thoughts unconsciously split our personality, our Being into parts.

 

What do you think?

Pain And Pleasure

The Duality of Pain And Pleasure

Our materialistic world is full of dualities and contradictions. Without Pain we know not of Pleasure. Only when we welcome Pain, we know and appreciate the sheer essence of Pleasure.I can’t agree with you more. If our hearts know not of Pain, how do we know there is Love?

If we don’t grow trees in our hearts, we’ll not let singing birds into hearts.

Energize…energize…

Energies flow where your intention goes.

How true that is. Many of us at one time or another, had some dreams that we gave up on. Or never ever got started. For those occasions, we were never focused enough to direct our energies appropriately to those dreams. Somehow or rather we had the comfort zone to get the better of us. Perhaps, we gave up or gave in too soon. We tried and tried and tried. At a spur of the moment when we need that comfort, we relented and gave up instantly on those dreams. We might be so very close to them. Yet not knowing, we gave in and submitted totally at the very last mile. Sigh!!

Realizing a dream needs action, courage and uncompromising perseverance. We need absolute motivation. Powerful motivation that we need to effortlessly summon within us. Strength. Do or die. That an attitude. We must adopt.

Yes. Finally. We’ve to believe absolutely in ourselves.

If it is to be, it is up to me!!

Only then can all our dreams burn blazing trails. Only then can we make our all dreams come true.

Life. Live It. Love It!!

Life. Live It. Love it!!

Every sixty seconds you spend upset is a minute of happiness you’ll never get back. Fear not that your life will end, be afraid that it’ll never begin.

Impure Mind

Impure Mind

“Impure mind is a past master in creating false grounds for continuing its present state of Being.”

Ambition Harmony Mind

Wisdom of Tao I Ching

Ambition
Those who wish to change the world
According with their desire
cannot succeed.

The world is shaped by the Way;

It cannot be shaped by the self.
Trying to change it, you damage it;
Trying to possess it, you lose it.

 

So some will lead, while others follow.
Some will be warm, others cold
Some will be strong, others weak.
Some will get where they are going
While others fall by the side of the road.

 

So the sage will be neither extravagant nor violent.


Harmony
Embracing the Way, you become embraced;
Breathing gently, you become newborn;
Clearing your mind, you become clear;
Nurturing your children, you become impartial;
Opening your heart, you become accepted;
Accepting the world, you embrace the Way.

Bearing and nurturing,
Creating but not owning,
Giving without demanding,
This is harmony.

 

Mind
The Way bears sensation,
Sensation bears memory,
Sensation and memory bear abstraction,Link

And abstraction bears all the world;
Each thing in the world bears feeling and doing,
And, imbued with mind, harmony with the Way.

 

As others have taught, so do I teach,
“Who loses harmony opposes nature”;
This is the root of my teaching.

Care at the Beginning

What lies still is easy to grasp;
What lies far off is easy to anticipate;
What is brittle is easy to shatter;
What is small is easy to disperse.

 

Yet a tree broader than a man can
embrace is born of a tiny shoot;
A dam greater than a river can
overflow starts with a clod of earth;
A journey of a thousand miles begins at the spot under one’s feet.

 

Therefore deal with things before they happen;
Create order before there is confusion.

Open Mind

“The mind is like a parachute – it works only when it is open.”

The Dalai Lama

Pranayama

Pranayama (Sanskrit: prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit word often translated as control of the life force (prana). When used as a technical term in yoga, it is often translated more specifically as “breath control.” Literal translations include A. A. Macdonell’s “suspension of breath” and I. K. Taimni’s “regulation of breath.”

 

Pranayama (Devanagari: prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit compound.

 

V. S. Apte provides fourteen different meanings for the word prana (Devanagari: prāṇa) including these:

 

* Breath, respiration
* The breath of life, vital air, principle of life (usually plural in this sense, there being five such vital airs generally assumed, but three, six, seven, nine, and even ten are also spoke of)
* Energy, vigor
* The spirit or soul

 

Of these meanings, the concept of “vital air” is used by Bhattacharyya to describe the concept as used in Sanskrit texts dealing with pranayama. Thomas McEvilley translates “prana” as “spirit-energy”.

 

Monier-Williams defines the compound prāṇāyāma as “N. of the three ‘breath-exercises’ performed during Saṃdhyā (See pūraka, recaka, kumbhaka.” This technical definition refers to a particular system of breath control with three processes as explained by Bhattacharyya: pūraka (to take the breath inside), kumbhaka (to retain it), and recaka (to discharge it). There are also other processes of pranayama in addition to this three-step model.

 

Macdonell gives the etymology as prāṇa + āyāma and defines it as “suspension of breath.”

 

Apte’s definition of āyāmaḥ derives it from ā + yām and provides several variant meanings for it when used in compounds. The first three meanings have to do with “length”, “expansion, extension”, and “stretching, extending”, but in the specific case of use in the compound prāṇāyāma he defines āyāmaḥ as meaning “restrain, control, stopping.”

 

An alternative etymology for the compound is cited by Ramamurti Mishra, who says that:

 

“Expansion of individual energy into cosmic energy is called prāṇāyāma (prāṇa, energy + ayām, expansion).”

 

The word “yama” (Devanagari: yāma) means “cessation” or more generally “control” or “restraint.”

 

Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

 

Pranayama is the fourth ‘limb’ of the eight limbs of Raja Yoga mentioned in verse 2.29 in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. Patanjali discusses his specific approach to pranayama in verses 2.49 through 2.51, and devotes verses 2.52 and 2.53 to explaining the benefits of the practice. Patanjali refers to pranayama as the control of life force that comes as a result of practicing the various breathing techniques, rather than the numerous breathing exercises themselves.

 

Many yoga teachers advise that pranayama should be part of an overall practice that includes the other limbs of Patanjali’s Raja Yoga teachings, especially Yama, Niyama, and Asana.

 

Medical claims

 

Several researchers have reported that pranayama techniques are beneficial in treating a range of stress related disorders,[32] improving autonomic functions, relieving symptoms of asthma, and reducing signs of oxidative stress. Practitioners report that the practice of pranayama develops a steady mind, strong will-power, and sound judgement, and also claim that sustained pranayama practice extends life and enhances perception.

Cautions & contraindications

 

Many yoga teachers recommend that pranayama techniques be practiced with care, and that advanced pranayama techniques should be practiced under the guidance of a teacher. These cautions are also made in traditional Hindu literature.

 

Quotes

 

“Prana is a subtle invisible force. It is the life-force that pervades the body. It is the factor that connects the body and the mind, because it is connected on one side with the body and on the other side with the mind. It is the connecting link between the body and the mind. The body and the mind have no direct connection. They are connected through Prana only and this Prana is different from the breathing you have in your physical body.” — Swami Chidananda Saraswati.

 

“Yoga works primarily with the energy in the body, through the science of pranayama, or energy-control. Prana means also ‘breath.’ Yoga teaches how, through breath-control, to still the mind and attain higher states of awareness. The higher teachings of yoga take one beyond techniques, and show the yogi, or yoga practitioner, how to direct his concentration in such a way as not only to harmonize human with divine consciousness, but to merge his consciousness in the Infinite.” — Paramahansa Yogananda

Inner Child

Inner Child

 

Think about this –

 

“Being” takes precedence over “Doing.” An infant or a young child is always in Being. We adult filter messages and stimuli all the time that we constantly remain at the Doing without pausing to be at Being.

 

IF IT IS TRUE WE CREATE OUR OWN REALITY THEN WHY THE BLEEP DO WE CREATE SUCH CHAOS?

 

It is a scientifically-proven fact that our mind does not know the difference between what is real and what is imagined.

 

What we conceive we achieve.

 

“What the Bleep Do We Know?”
is taking the metaphysical and recovery worlds by storm. The movie’s storyline weaves a womans addictive battles with quirky animation to depict the impact our thoughts have on every cell of our body. Sprinkled between the real and imaginary scenes are interviews with some of the world’s most renowned quantum physicists, spiritualists and alternative healers who substantiate the movie’s suggestions with compelling research and extraordinary possibilities.

 

One significant scene features the work of Dr. Masaru Emoto who “…discovered that crystals formed in frozen water reveal changes when specific, concentrated thoughts are directed toward them. He found that water from clear springs and water that has been exposed to loving words shows brilliant, complex, and colorful snowflake patterns. In contrast, polluted water, or water exposed to negative thoughts, forms incomplete, asymmetrical patterns with dull colors.”

 

When you focus positive, loving thoughts on your dreams
your mind starts the process of creating them

 

UNLESS

 

those thoughts get ambushed by your doubts and fears
which then create chaos and frustration.

 

If terror, betrayal, fear of abandonment or shame are attached to the manifestation of our dreams, those dreams will eventually be annihilated with negativity. If our dreams are based on the values of others instead of our own internal values and desires we deny the essence of our true self. The manifestation of our dreams is contingent on our being connected to our true self. When we are not connected, we feel a loss not only of our dreams but also a loss of our true self!

 

This loss of our true self evolves from our adapting to become who we think we need to be in hopes of feeling accepted and loved. Loss activates the process of grief. It is involuntary. It is a natural, predictable series of emotional responses we engage in any time we experience loss of any kind. These emotional responses affect the way we think and the manner in which we express our emotions.

 

“What the Bleep Do We Know?” offers its audience the latest scientific research supporting the existence of a bio-chemical component linked to these emotional responses. What you think, feel and say plays such a profound role that you literally can (and unconsciously do) use your thoughts, feelings and statements to impact your cells.

 

Athletes know this. Cancer-survivors know this. They have long known the power of positive, deliberate intention and affirmation. They employ these techniques with great success. What most of us do not keep in mind, on a day-to-day basis, however, is the fact that when our thoughts, feelings and statements are negative they produce negative results. Our cells flat-line… become lethargic… and are programmed to energetically attract exactly what we intend. If we tell ourselves we are fat, our cells create fat. If we tell ourselves we are a failure, we creative situations in which we fail. If we fear getting hurt, we attract hurtful situations. This pattern of negative belief systems, self-negating feelings and incriminating self-talk begins in childhood in response to the first moment we are confronted with not feeling safe.

 

THE ESSENTIAL WOUND – Each of us experienced that climatic moment when we realized we were not safe. It is part of the human experience. Many refer to this moment as the essential wound. Our psyche experiences a trauma which shatters our basic assumption about our world. This trauma can be a result of neglect, sexual or physical abuse or mental cruelty through shame and belittlement. It can be experienced in this lifetime or can even be carried over from a previous lifetime. The DNA blueprint of our first remembered soul experience of being unsafe is carried in the etheric body and impacts the force field of our current incarnation.

 

In response to this realization, irrespective of its origin, our psyche goes into shock. We either dissociate from the emotion of the event or bury recall of the event, thus banishing the memory deep into the unconscious mind. The stress of these traumas, however, gets recorded in the electrical systems of our bodies and ultimately emerges as symptoms of what is called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder-PTSD – Until recently it was thought PTSD affected only combat veterans. Now scientists know that, in fact, not only are survivors of atrocities such as the Holocaust, torture, war, natural disasters, catastrophic illnesses, and horrific accidents susceptible to PTSD but anyone who is exposed to an on-going threat to his or her safety, such as physical or sexual abuse, rape, domestic violence, family alcoholism, or any experience which threatens ones basic survival can develop a form of PTSD. Remarkably, this holds true even if a person witnesses a traumatic event. If, as a child, you observed the abuse of your mother or the abuse of a sibling you can develop debilitating symptoms from just having been a witness.

 

Traumas of such great magnitude shatter our basic assumption about the world and our personal safety. The impact can leave us feeling alienated, distrustful or overly clinging. These responses are buried and surface only when there is a trigger which brings these feelings back to the surface. However, underneath the surface, the electrically-charged emotions related to these traumas are forever coded in our bodies and are conditioning our cells to attract exactly that which we most fear. The process becomes circular our fear perpetuates this Post Traumatic Stress response and our PTS response perpetuates our fear. This fear creates anxiety. Anxiety is the first stage of grief. We are perpetually responding to the never-ending loss of our true self. Why? Because when we feel unsafe, we deny our true self and develop the adapted self as we become who we think we need to be in order to be loved and protected.

 

Source: Create Reality – Create Chaos By Cathryn Taylor, M.A., MFT, LADC

Miracle

A little girl went to her bedroom and pulled a glass jelly jar from its hiding place in the closet.

 

She poured the change out on the floor and counted it carefully.

 

Three times, even. The total had to be exactly perfect. No chance here for mistakes.

 

Carefully placing the coins back in the jar and twisting on the cap, she slipped out the back door and made her way 6 blocks to Rexall’s Drug Store with the big red Indian Chief sign above the door.

 

She waited patiently for the pharmacist to give her some attention, but he was too busy at this moment. Tess twisted her feet to make a scuffing noise. Nothing. She cleared her throat with the most disgusting sound she could muster. No good. Finally she took a quarter from her jar and banged it on the glass counter. That did it!

 

And what do you want?‘ the pharmacist asked in an annoyed tone of voice. ‘I’m talking to my brother from Chicago whom I haven’t seen in ages,’ he said without waiting for a reply to his question.

 

‘Well, I want to talk to you about my brother,’ Tess answered back in the same annoyed tone. ‘He’s really, really sick … and I want to buy a miracle.’

 

‘I beg your pardon?’ said the pharmacist.

 

‘His name is Andrew and he has something bad growing inside his head and my Daddy says only a miracle can save him now. So how much does a miracle cost?’

 

‘We don’t sell miracles here, little girl. I’m sorry but I can’t help you,’ the pharmacist said, softening a little.

 

‘Listen, I have the money to pay for it. If it isn’t enough, I will get the rest. Just tell me how much it costs.’

 

The pharmacist’s brother was a well dressed man. He stooped down and asked the little girl, ‘What kind of a miracle does your brother need?’

 

‘ I don’t know,’ Tess replied with her eyes welling up. ‘I just know he’s really sick and Mommy says he needs an operation. But my Daddy can’t pay for it, so I want to use my money.’

 

‘How much do you have?’ asked the man from Chicago .

 

‘One dollar and eleven cents,’ Tess answered barely au dibly.

 

‘And it’s all the money I have, but I can get some more if I need to.’

 

‘Well, what a coincidence,’ smiled the man. ‘A dollar and eleven cents – the exact price of a miracle for little brothers.’

 

He took her money in one hand and with the other hand he grasped her mitten and said ‘Take me to where you live. I want to see your brother and meet your parents. Let’s see if I have the miracle you need.’

 

That well dressed man was Dr. Carlton Armstrong, a surgeon, specializing in neuro-surgery. The operation was completed free of charge and it wasn’t long until Andrew was home again and doing well.

 

Mom and Dad were happily talking about the chain of events that had led them to this place.

 

‘That surgery,’ her Mom whispered. ‘was a real miracle. I wonder how much it would have cost?’

 

Tess smiled. She knew exactly how much a miracle cost … one dollar and eleven cents … plus the faith of a little child.

 

In our lives, we never know how many miracles we will need.

 

A miracle is not the suspension of natural law, but the operation of a higher law. I know you’ll keep the ball moving!

 

Here it goes. Throw it back to someone who means something to you!

 

A ball is a circle, no beginning, no end. It keeps us together like our Circle of Friends. But the treasure inside for you to see is the treasure of friendship you’ve granted to me.

 

Today I pass the friendship ball to you.

 

Pass it on to someone who is a friend to you.

 

MY OATH TO YOU…

 

When you are sad … I will dry your tears.

 

When you are scared … I will comfort your fears.

 

When you are worried … I will give you hope.

 

When you are confused … I will help you cope.

 

And when you are lost … And can’t see the light, I shall be your beacon … Shining ever so bright.

 

This is my oath … I pledge till the end.

 

Why you may ask? Bec au se you’re my friend.

 

Signed:

 

GOD

Worldview Of NLP

Main article: Neuro-linguistic programming

 

Neuro-linguistic programming studies and models how people think about and perceive aspects of their life, and how to work with the underlying cognitive and emotional processes at a practical level. The range of potential uses is varied, and NLP has an exceptionally broad and adaptable structure.

 

The field originated in the work of Richard Bandler, John Grinder in association with polymath Gregory Bateson in Santa Cruz, California in the early 1970s, when they recorded and studied in depth several world renowned therapists who seemed to obtain almost magical[1] results by the therapeutic standards of the time. They concluded that a comprehensive set of self-taught approaches and skills was largely responsible for their success, that these could be summarized and expanded upon, and that much of human perception and experience was also structured and could be worked with effectively in this way. They stated, in contravention of the professional wisdom of that time, that the internal human experience demonstrated itself in people’s behaviors, and could be worked with directly given an appropriate mindset, and that this was why certain individuals were so singularly successful as therapists compared to the norm.

 

Despite its substantial influence and adoption of its viewpoints, extreme skepticism persists in some quarters, due both to its pop psychology usage and non-traditional approach to psychology.

 


Techniques v. attitudes

 

Grinder and Bandler made very clear that there was a profound (although blurred) difference between skills and techniques as a basis for working with people, and attitudes and approaches.

 

“People who come to us in therapy typically have pain in their lives and experience little or no choice in matters which they consider important. All therapies are confronted with the problem of responding adequately to such people. Responding adequately in this context means to us assisting in changing the client’s experience in some way which enriches it. Rarely do therapies accomplish this by changing the world. Their approach, then, is typically to change the client’s experience of the world. People do not operate directly on the world, but operate necessarily on the world through their perception or model of the world. Therapies, then, characteristically operate to change the client’s model of the world and consequently the client’s behavior and experiences.”

 


Purpose and basis of NLP’s world view

 

The founders of NLP emphasize that in their experience, experts in human communication all have a similar approach, and it is this approach (and not the technical skills) which distinguishes them, and which can be learned:

 

“When you watch and listen to Virginia Satir and Milton Erickson do therapy, they apparently could not be more different…People also report that the experiences of being with them are profoundly different. However, if you examine their behavior and the essential key patterns and sequences of what they do, they are similar…. The same was true of Fritz Perls… when he was operating in what I consider a powerful and effective way, he was using the same sequences of patterns that you will find in their work.

 

Analyzing this further, Grinder and Bandler stated that there were a very few common traits such people – whether top therapists, top executives or top salespeople – all seemed to share:

 

1. Everything they did in their work, was pro-active (rather than reactive), directed moment to moment by well-formed outcomes rather than formalized fixed beliefs
2. They were exceedingly flexible in approach and refused to be tied down to using their skills in any one fixed way of thinking or working
3. They were extremely aware moment by moment, of the non-verbal feedback (unconscious communicationn and metaphor) they were getting, and responded to it – usually in kind rather than by analyzing it
4. They enjoyed the challenges of difficult (“resistant”) clients, seeing them as a chance to learn rather than an intractable “problem”
5. They respected the client as someone doing the best they knew how (rather than judging them as “broken” or “working”)
6. They had certain common skills and things they were aware of and noticed, intuitively “wired in”
7. They worked with great precision, purpose, and skill
8. They kept trying many many different things until they learned enough about the structure holding a problem in place to change it

 

They summarized their findings:

 

“You need only three things to be an absolutely exquisite communicator. We have found that there are three major patterns in the behavior of every therapeutic wizard we’ve talked to — and executives, and salespeople. The first one is to know what outcome you want. The second is that you need flexibility in your behavior. You need to be able to generate lots and lots of different behaviors to find out what responses you get. The third is you need to have enough sensory experience to notice when you get the responses that you want…”

 


Skills vs. philosophy in NLP

 

Grinder and Bandler stated categorically that although these people had developed many innovative and effective skills,[10] the core of their effectiveness was neither their skills, nor some mystical or unknowable quality or personality. It was primarily the attitudes, approaches and philosophies they had in common which made them capable of effective work, and these could be learned and transmitted. When this was done, others could learn from these models to be effective the same way. This approach became central within the philosophy and epistemology of NLP:

 

What we essentially do is to pay very little attention to what people say they do and a great deal of attention to what they do… We know that our modeling has been successful when we can systematically get the same behavioral outcome [results] as the person we have modeled. And when we can teach somebody else to be able to get the same outcomes in a systematic way, that’s an even stronger test.

 

We don’t know what Virginia Satir really does with families. However, we can describe her behavior in such a way that we can come to any one of you and say ‘Here. Take this. Do these things in this sequence. Practice until it becomes a systematic part of your unconscious behavior, and you will end up being able to elicit the same responses that Virginia elicits.’ We do not test the description we arrive at for ‘accuracy’, or how it fits with neurological data, or statistics about what should be going on. All we do in order to understand whether our description is an adequate model… is to find out whether it works or not: – are you able to exhibit effectively in your behavior the same patterns that Virginia exhibits in hers, and get the same results?

 

We will be making statements up here which may have no relationship to the ‘truth,’ to what’s ‘really going on.’ We do know, however, that the model that we have made up of her behavior has been effective. After being exposed to it and practicing the patterns and the descriptions that we have offered, people’s behavior changes in ways that make them effective in the same way that Satir is.

 

– Frogs into Princes, pp.7, 9-10

 


Features of NLP’s world view


Subjectivity

 

Unlike classical psychology, the subjective character of experience is integral to NLP. (Subjective in the NLP sense means “as internally experienced”, rather than ‘arbitrary’ or ‘whimsical’). It is taken for granted that what people perceive, believe and feel, is more significant to their lives than what is objectively ‘true’, and takes for granted that each person’s awareness and inner world is different and unique. It is emphasized that one must leave ones’ own preconceptions behind, and be willing to understand and work within the other person’s “reality”, to have any great effect, since no one map of reality can be said to be “true”. There are only (in NLP’s view) better or worse maps, a concept taken from Korzybski’s general semantics.

 

There is an order and a structured logic to it. But that order and logic varies individually and people interact and judge their (and others) lives and actions based upon their own understandings of the world, not upon some objective reality.

 

Human nature

 

NLP does not (subject to physiological pathology) consider people “broken” or “working”. All people have a neurology, experience of life, and the innate ability to change their perspective on any aspect of their life, and the nature of neurology is very adaptable. They also have great wisdom in their unconscious minds, even if they do not seem to be able to always use it or it seems on the surface, dysfunctional. One does not have to be in trance for unconscious processes to be effective.

 

NLP view human authenticity as bound up with the capability to respond and how much awareness of choice is experienced in actions and responses. Bandler comments, “We’re talking about basic beliefs regarding human capability. Here’s the only truth about that. Nobody knows.”

 

In NLP, “understanding” is less important than change. Most human learning occurs outside consciousness, and some learnings may even be sabotaged by conscious attention. According to NLP, the brain is capable of learning (or re-learning) patterns extremely fast, and that change can happen quickly, often without conscious mediation. Dysfunctional patterns can be addressed through cognitive routes (talking therapies) or non-cognitive routes (working with the body and unconscious mind), and particularly, by directly retraining the mind to use its innate capability to learn new patterns in a deliberate manner. NLP believes that “People already have all the resources they need, to change”, that the mind/brain is very willing to change once it “knows” how, and that guided with skill and sensitivity, change provides an increased sense of control over ones’ life.

 

A powerful demonstration of these interactions by Baxter (1994) found that NLP reframing used to treat obsessive compulsive disorder in place of Prozac, resulted in the same raised serotonin levels and reduced caudate nucleus activity as control subjects who took medication (as measured by positron emission tomography, a type of neural imaging).

 


Systems view

 

People are complex adaptive (learning) systems and processes, and have a richness to them which no simple system can fully predict or capture. Our bodies, our societies, and our planet form an ecology of complex systems and sub-systems all of which interact with and mutually influence each other. “Intuitively obvious” results are not always to be expected. Positive and negative feedback, leverage points, interpretational context, and other features of complex systems will come into play. In humans, the body impacts on the mind, and the mind impacts on the body. Thought, emotional state, somatic awareness, perception, and body usage, as well as neurochemistry and other hormonal interactions, and external circumstances, are all profoundly interdependent and deeply connected, and any can influence or be influenced by another.

 

In NLP it is therefore seen as important not to make untested assumptions about individuals, that there are many more ways than the obvious to approach a seemingly intractable problem, it is understood there will usually be unconscious goals, limiting beliefs or secondary gains present in any situation, and that there is an art as well as a skill in perceiving how best to approach this. Change is also systemic. That is, it does not happen in a vacuum and is not limited to the “problem area”, but usually is connected to other aspects of life, which are part of the situation as well as a necessary part of any solution. Partly for this reason, NLP leaves deliberately open and unlimited, its areas of interest and its scope.

 

As a special case of systemic thinking, NLP emphasizes that change is relational. That is, change happens in a relational context, whether the self-relationship or the relationship with another person (parent, friend, partner, employer, co-worker, role model, clinician, trainer). Change happens in a relationship, and the quality of that relationship, known as rapport, is often critical to the ability to change.

 


Meaning and context in communication

 

NLP views meaning as only existing within a given context, a view known as cultural relativism which is axiomatic in anthropology. Because of this, NLP states The meaning of communication is the result you get – it is not message sent, but message received, and willingness to set aside preconceived interpretive frames, which is most significant in communication.

 

The process of interpreting “meaning” from thought and speech is complex and (as pointed out in sciences such as cognitive linguistics, transformational grammar and general semantics) can involve a wide range of distortions, errors, and mistranslations because internal experiences, thoughts and feelings have to be translated back and forth through conscious perceptual filters, into crude symbols known as ‘words’. The resulting patterns of speech are considered highly revealing of the unconscious perceptual filters involved.

 

NLP considers all behavior, at some level, communicative. Thus even undesired or clinical states such as depression and confusion have a structure, a purpose, and an underlying communication – or in other words, on their own terms, all mental states have a rational structure within their given context. Such states are often viewed by NLP not as problems, but as valuable resource states which are not being understood or acted upon, or a part of a person trying to grow or change, or which require a better ‘map’ of reality. NLP also considers much communication metaphorical, and that even its own tools can be philosophically interpreted as metaphors used to guide useful responses, rather than literal objective ‘truth statements’.

 


Form and content

 

In NLP, underlying subjective (perceived, cognitive) structure (“form”) matters more than specific situational “content”. The subjective structure of a perceived problem matters more than the situation in which it is embedded. This is an embodiment of the form/content distinction in philosophy, also favored by Western psychiatric medicine (an innovation first argued for by psychiatrists Karl Jaspers and Kurt Schneider), and is also a feature within cognitive linguistics.

 

NLP takes this principle into the field, with so-called “content free” work being a common respected NLP skill – that is, where no details of the situation are shared or sought, but only the cognitive features of how it is structured are relevant. Despite the practitioner lacking knowledge of the actual situation, knowledge of the structural aspects alone (modalities, strategies, outcome orientation and the like) are often sufficient by themselves to allow NLP to work with full effectiveness. Common rationales for working with reduced content in this manner are:

 

* The less content is involved, the more the practitioner is client- rather than self- or interpretation-focussed
* The less distraction (ie, loss of strategic focus) due to content is likely to arise.
* Other than perhaps for rapport purposes, the extra information is generally not very relevant to NLP’s strategic structural approach, so it is wasteful of time to dwell on it

 


NLP is in the present and oriented towards the future

 

No matter the personal history, the only memory of it is in the present neurology and life. The past has no existence independent of this. Therefore what is explored is the memory and impressions of events in the present – present experiences, present constructions, and present limits, including the present beliefs about their existence and origins. What is then aimed for is to build in the present, a changed future, where old, outdated, or dysfunctional beliefs and patterns are no longer an issue.

 


Common sayings (or principles)

 

The following are some of NLP’s most recognized principles and presuppositions, in their well known aphoristic forms. They are often summarized as soundbites so as to be short, pithy, and memorable, and a fuller discussion of these (as well as some of the other common NLP sayings) is given in Principles of NLP.

 


Perspectives:

 

* The map is not the territory
* People already have all the resources they need to succeed [or change]

 


 

Systemic view:

 


 

* Life and ‘Mind’ are systemic processes

 


 

Information and interpretation:

 


 

* Behind every behavior is a positive intention
* There is no failure, only feedback
* The meaning of your communication is the response you get
* Choice is better than no choice (and flexibility is the way one gets choice)
* Multiple descriptions are better than one
* There are no resistant clients; there are only incompetent [less skilled] therapists

 


 

Working approaches:

 


* If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you always got
(or: If what you are doing isn’t working, try something [anything] else)
* Good NLP is 90% information gathering and testing, and 10% changework
* Everyone is different
* Use whatever works
* If something can be done effectively and ecologically in ten minutes, don’t spend an hour doing it

3900 Saturdays And 1,000 Marbles

 

The older I get, the more I enjoy Saturday mornings. Perhaps it’s the quiet solitude that comes with being the first to rise, or maybe it’s the unbounded joy of not having to be at work. Either way, the first few hours of a Saturday morning are most enjoyable.

 

A few weeks ago, I was shuffling toward the garage with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the morning paper in the other. What began as a typical Saturday morning turned into one of those lessons that life seems to hand you from time to time. Let me tell you about it:

 

I turned the dial up into the phone portion of the band on my ham radio in order to listen to a Saturday morning swap net. Along the way, I came across an older sounding chap, with a tremendous signal and a golden voice. You know the kind; he sounded like he should be in the broadcasting business. He was telling whom-ever he was talking with something about “a thousand marbles.” I was intrigued and stopped to listen to what he had to say–

 

Well, Tom, it sure sounds like you’re busy with your job. I’m sure they pay you well but it’s a shame you have to be away from home and your family so much. Hard to believe a young fellow should have to work sixty or seventy hours a week to make ends meet. It’s too bad you missed your daughter’s “dance recital” he continued.”Let me tell you something that has helped me keep my own priorities.” And that’s when he began to explain his theory of a “thousand marbles.

 

You see, I sat down one day and did a little arithmetic. The average person lives about seventy-five years. I know, some live more and some live less, but on average, folks live about seventy-five years.

 

Now then, I multiplied 75 times 52 and I came up with 3900, which is the number of Saturdays that the average person has in their entire lifetime. Now, stick with me, Tom, I’m getting to the important part.It took me until I was fifty-five years old to think about all this in any detail”, he went on, “and by that time I had lived through over twenty-eight hundred Saturdays.

 

I got to thinking that if I lived to be seventy-five, I only had about a thousand of them left to enjoy. So I went to a toy store and bought every single marble they had. I ended up having to visit three toy stores to round up 1000 marbles. I took them home and put them inside a large, clear plastic container right here in the shack next to my gear.

 

Every Saturday since then, I have taken one marble out and thrown it away. I found that by watching the marbles diminish, I focused more on the really important things in life. There is nothing like watching your time here on this earth run out to help get your priorities straight .

 

Now let me tell you one last thing before I sign-off with you and take my lovely wife out for breakfast. This morning, I took the very last marble out of the container. I figure that if I make it until next Saturday then I have been given a little extra time. And the one thing we can all use is a little more time.

 

It was nice to meet you Tom, I hope you spend more time with your family, and I hope to meet you again here on the band. This is a 75 Year old Man, K9NZQ, clear and going QRT, good morning!

 

You could have heard a pin drop on the band when this fellow signed off. I guess he gave us all a lot to think about. I had planned to work on the antenna that morning, and then I was going to meet up with a few hams to work on the next club newsletter.
Instead, I went upstairs and woke my wife up with a kiss. “ C’mon honey, I’m taking you and the kids to breakfast.”

 

What brought this on?” she asked with a smile.

 

Oh, nothing special, it’s just been a long time since we spent a Saturday together with the kids. And hey, can we stop at a toy store while we’re out? I need to buy some marbles.

 

p/s … “If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day, so I never have to live without you.” – Winnie the Pooh.

Awareness

The event is nothing;

The respond is everything.

We do have a choice;

We can’t change the event but we can change our perception.

An event is always in the past tense. Do we want to live the past? It’s gone. That event coming back will not be exactly the same. Just like water in a flowing river, that water will never ever be the same. Do we want to expand our energies in an event that has already gone past for good? An anger, an irritation, a frustration, a sadness, a guilt, a fear.

 

Making a choice is being in the “Presence”. Being in “Now”. Letting the Past go. Releasing it. Finding a closure. Forgiving. Our life’s meant to be a joyful journey. We’re all here to live. Forgiving and releasing what has just pasted is the beginning to be aware of our Being.

 

Being in the Presence. Being in Now.

 

Similar to being in a relationship. Many of us during the times when we’re being with our parents, spouses, friends or children, we’re in a state of drifted lost. We’re not being aware of the joy of those connections. Our daily pressures and demand distant us from enjoying those connections. We tend to be lost in enjoying those relationships. We’re lost in our own thoughts while being with them. We aren’t being in an Aware state. We’re not in the flow. We’re being around our relationships for the sake of just being around. How often do we enjoy everyone single moment when we’re being around them. It’s not the amount time that we spent being with them. It’s about the quality time, although it might be for just a few minutes. If each of those minutes is a joy to both parties, those moments were not lost.

 

Just like when we fall in love, each moment is a blissful romantic moment. We’re in the flow; we’re being in absolute awareness; we’re being in absolute presence.

 

Think about this story…

 

A king was once asked by a man, “how can you be in a state of constant awareness. You’ve all the richness to corrupt you, to spoil you. You’ve the power to distract you“.

 

The king replied, “why not. Let me show you. Now carry this hot pot of oil on your head and never spill a drop. Follow me for a stroll beyond the gates of my palace“.

 

The king and the man walked past busy streets filled with aromas, sounds of music, whispers, snake charmers and beautiful women.

 

Having returning to the palace after the walk, the king asked the man, “now relate to me what you’d heard, the smell, things you’ve seen and felt “.

 

The man replied, “how could I’ve done any of those. I was concentrating on making sure the pot of oil was steadily balanced on my head“.

 

The king replied, “there you go. You’re in an absolute state of bliss. In total awareness and nothing else in important. You’re in the Presence. The events around you didn’t matter at all. You’re totally absorb with the moments while the pot of oil was on your head“.

 

Just like – each breathe that we take, it’s a new breathe. We chose to enjoy that new breathe or treat it as just another breathe. “If it is to be, it is up to me“.

 

Make that choice NOW.

Detoxification. What is it? In general it is the removal of toxic substances from the body. It is one of the major functions of the liver, lower gastrointestinal tract and kidneys, but can also be achieved artificially by techniques such as dialysis and chelation therapy. Below provides more information into drug addiction and detoxification help.There are many sorts of detox methods available in the marketplace. These include –

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3900 Saturdays And 1,000 MarblesThe older I get, the more I enjoy Saturday mornings. Perhaps it’s the quiet solitude that comes with being the first to rise, or maybe it’s the unbounded joy of not having to be at work. Either way, the first few hours of a Saturday morning are most enjoyable.

A few weeks ago, I was shuffling toward the garage with a steaming cup of coffee in one hand and the morning paper in the other. What began as a typical Saturday morning turned into one of those lessons that life seems to hand you from time to time. Let me tell you about it:

I turned the dial up into the phone portion of the band on my ham radio in order to listen to a Saturday morning swap net. Along the way, I came across an older sounding chap, with a tremendous signal and a golden voice. You know the kind; he sounded like he should be in the broadcasting business. He was telling whom-ever he was talking with something about “a thousand marbles.” I was intrigued and stopped to listen to what he had to say–

Well, Tom, it sure sounds like you’re busy with your job. I’m sure they pay you well but it’s a shame you have to be away from home and your family so much. Hard to believe a young fellow should have to work sixty or seventy hours a week to make ends meet. It’s too bad you missed your daughter’s “dance recital” he continued.”Let me tell you something that has helped me keep my own priorities.” And that’s when he began to explain his theory of a “thousand marbles.

You see, I sat down one day and did a little arithmetic. The average person lives about seventy-five years. I know, some live more and some live less, but on average, folks live about seventy-five years.

Now then, I multiplied 75 times 52 and I came up with 3900, which is the number of Saturdays that the average person has in their entire lifetime. Now, stick with me, Tom, I’m getting to the important part.It took me until I was fifty-five years old to think about all this in any detail”, he went on, “and by that time I had lived through over twenty-eight hundred Saturdays.

I got to thinking that if I lived to be seventy-five, I only had about a thousand of them left to enjoy. So I went to a toy store and bought every single marble they had. I ended up having to visit three toy stores to round up 1000 marbles. I took them home and put them inside a large, clear plastic container right here in the shack next to my gear.

Every Saturday since then, I have taken one marble out and thrown it away. I found that by watching the marbles diminish, I focused more on the really important things in life. There is nothing like watching your time here on this earth run out to help get your priorities straight .

Now let me tell you one last thing before I sign-off with you and take my lovely wife out for breakfast. This morning, I took the very last marble out of the container. I figure that if I make it until next Saturday then I have been given a little extra time. And the one thing we can all use is a little more time.

It was nice to meet you Tom, I hope you spend more time with your family, and I hope to meet you again here on the band. This is a 75 Year old Man, K9NZQ, clear and going QRT, good morning!

You could have heard a pin drop on the band when this fellow signed off. I guess he gave us all a lot to think about. I had planned to work on the antenna that morning, and then I was going to meet up with a few hams to work on the next club newsletter.
Instead, I went upstairs and woke my wife up with a kiss. “

C’mon honey, I’m taking you and the kids to breakfast.”What brought this on?” she asked with a smile.

Oh, nothing special, it’s just been a long time since we spent a Saturday together with the kids. And hey, can we stop at a toy store while we’re out? I need to buy some marbles.

p/s … “If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day, so I never have to live without you.” – Winnie the Pooh.

Worldview Of NLP

The Worldview and working model of Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) covers the underlying philosophy of NLP, and how and why this philosophy is intended to be used in practice.

Neuro-linguistic programming is an approach to communication and psychology. It is based upon observing naturally self-taught expertise, and modeling the processes and habitual patterns such experts seem to repeatedly use which seem to be responsible for the results they obtain. As such, NLP has its own methodology and philosophical approach towards being effective within the human world, born of pragmatism rather than theory.

Much of NLP’s philosophy, worldview and approach, and discussion of their basis, was laid out in its early books, such as Structure of Magic vol. 1 + 2 and Frogs into Princes.

Contents

* 1 Overview of NLP
* 2 Techniques v. attitudes
* 3 Purpose and basis of NLP’s world view
* 4 Skills vs. philosophy in NLP
* 5 Features of NLP’s world view
o 5.1 Subjectivity
o 5.2 Human nature
o 5.3 Systems view
o 5.4 Meaning and context in communication
o 5.5 Form and content
o 5.6 NLP is in the present and oriented towards the future
* 6 Common sayings (or principles)
* 7 How NLP applies its philosophy

Overview of NLP

Main article: Neuro-linguistic programming

Neuro-linguistic programming studies and models how people think about and perceive aspects of their life, and how to work with the underlying cognitive and emotional processes at a practical level. The range of potential uses is varied, and NLP has an exceptionally broad and adaptable structure.

The field originated in the work of Richard Bandler, John Grinder in association with polymath Gregory Bateson in Santa Cruz, California in the early 1970s, when they recorded and studied in depth several world renowned therapists who seemed to obtain almost magical[1] results by the therapeutic standards of the time. They concluded that a comprehensive set of self-taught approaches and skills was largely responsible for their success, that these could be summarized and expanded upon, and that much of human perception and experience was also structured and could be worked with effectively in this way. They stated, in contravention of the professional wisdom of that time, that the internal human experience demonstrated itself in people’s behaviors, and could be worked with directly given an appropriate mindset, and that this was why certain individuals were so singularly successful as therapists compared to the norm.

Despite its substantial influence and adoption of its viewpoints, extreme skepticism persists in some quarters, due both to its pop psychology usage and non-traditional approach to psychology.

Techniques v. attitudes

Grinder and Bandler made very clear that there was a profound (although blurred) difference between skills and techniques as a basis for working with people, and attitudes and approaches.

“People who come to us in therapy typically have pain in their lives and experience little or no choice in matters which they consider important. All therapies are confronted with the problem of responding adequately to such people. Responding adequately in this context means to us assisting in changing the client’s experience in some way which enriches it. Rarely do therapies accomplish this by changing the world. Their approach, then, is typically to change the client’s experience of the world. People do not operate directly on the world, but operate necessarily on the world through their perception or model of the world. Therapies, then, characteristically operate to change the client’s model of the world and consequently the client’s behavior and experiences.”

Purpose and basis of NLP’s world view

The founders of NLP emphasize that in their experience, experts in human communication all have a similar approach, and it is this approach (and not the technical skills) which distinguishes them, and which can be learned:

“When you watch and listen to Virginia Satir and Milton Erickson do therapy, they apparently could not be more different…People also report that the experiences of being with them are profoundly different. However, if you examine their behavior and the essential key patterns and sequences of what they do, they are similar…. The same was true of Fritz Perls… when he was operating in what I consider a powerful and effective way, he was using the same sequences of patterns that you will find in their work.

Analyzing this further, Grinder and Bandler stated that there were a very few common traits such people – whether top therapists, top executives or top salespeople – all seemed to share:

1. Everything they did in their work, was pro-active (rather than reactive), directed moment to moment by well-formed outcomes rather than formalized fixed beliefs
2. They were exceedingly flexible in approach and refused to be tied down to using their skills in any one fixed way of thinking or working
3. They were extremely aware moment by moment, of the non-verbal feedback (unconscious communicationn and metaphor) they were getting, and responded to it – usually in kind rather than by analyzing it
4. They enjoyed the challenges of difficult (“resistant”) clients, seeing them as a chance to learn rather than an intractable “problem”
5. They respected the client as someone doing the best they knew how (rather than judging them as “broken” or “working”)
6. They had certain common skills and things they were aware of and noticed, intuitively “wired in”
7. They worked with great precision, purpose, and skill
8. They kept trying many many different things until they learned enough about the structure holding a problem in place to change it

They summarized their findings:

“You need only three things to be an absolutely exquisite communicator. We have found that there are three major patterns in the behavior of every therapeutic wizard we’ve talked to — and executives, and salespeople. The first one is to know what outcome you want. The second is that you need flexibility in your behavior. You need to be able to generate lots and lots of different behaviors to find out what responses you get. The third is you need to have enough sensory experience to notice when you get the responses that you want…”

Skills vs. philosophy in NLP

Grinder and Bandler stated categorically that although these people had developed many innovative and effective skills,[10] the core of their effectiveness was neither their skills, nor some mystical or unknowable quality or personality. It was primarily the attitudes, approaches and philosophies they had in common which made them capable of effective work, and these could be learned and transmitted. When this was done, others could learn from these models to be effective the same way. This approach became central within the philosophy and epistemology of NLP:

What we essentially do is to pay very little attention to what people say they do and a great deal of attention to what they do… We know that our modeling has been successful when we can systematically get the same behavioral outcome [results] as the person we have modeled. And when we can teach somebody else to be able to get the same outcomes in a systematic way, that’s an even stronger test.

We don’t know what Virginia Satir really does with families. However, we can describe her behavior in such a way that we can come to any one of you and say ‘Here. Take this. Do these things in this sequence. Practice until it becomes a systematic part of your unconscious behavior, and you will end up being able to elicit the same responses that Virginia elicits.’ We do not test the description we arrive at for ‘accuracy’, or how it fits with neurological data, or statistics about what should be going on. All we do in order to understand whether our description is an adequate model… is to find out whether it works or not: – are you able to exhibit effectively in your behavior the same patterns that Virginia exhibits in hers, and get the same results?

We will be making statements up here which may have no relationship to the ‘truth,’ to what’s ‘really going on.’ We do know, however, that the model that we have made up of her behavior has been effective. After being exposed to it and practicing the patterns and the descriptions that we have offered, people’s behavior changes in ways that make them effective in the same way that Satir is.

– Frogs into Princes, pp.7, 9-10


Features of NLP’s world view


Subjectivity

Unlike classical psychology, the subjective character of experience is integral to NLP. (Subjective in the NLP sense means “as internally experienced”, rather than ‘arbitrary’ or ‘whimsical’). It is taken for granted that what people perceive, believe and feel, is more significant to their lives than what is objectively ‘true’, and takes for granted that each person’s awareness and inner world is different and unique. It is emphasized that one must leave ones’ own preconceptions behind, and be willing to understand and work within the other person’s “reality”, to have any great effect, since no one map of reality can be said to be “true”. There are only (in NLP’s view) better or worse maps, a concept taken from Korzybski’s general semantics.

There is an order and a structured logic to it. But that order and logic varies individually and people interact and judge their (and others) lives and actions based upon their own understandings of the world, not upon some objective reality.

Human nature

NLP does not (subject to physiological pathology) consider people “broken” or “working”. All people have a neurology, experience of life, and the innate ability to change their perspective on any aspect of their life, and the nature of neurology is very adaptable. They also have great wisdom in their unconscious minds, even if they do not seem to be able to always use it or it seems on the surface, dysfunctional. One does not have to be in trance for unconscious processes to be effective.

NLP view human authenticity as bound up with the capability to respond and how much awareness of choice is experienced in actions and responses. Bandler comments, “We’re talking about basic beliefs regarding human capability. Here’s the only truth about that. Nobody knows.”

In NLP, “understanding” is less important than change. Most human learning occurs outside consciousness, and some learnings may even be sabotaged by conscious attention. According to NLP, the brain is capable of learning (or re-learning) patterns extremely fast, and that change can happen quickly, often without conscious mediation. Dysfunctional patterns can be addressed through cognitive routes (talking therapies) or non-cognitive routes (working with the body and unconscious mind), and particularly, by directly retraining the mind to use its innate capability to learn new patterns in a deliberate manner. NLP believes that “People already have all the resources they need, to change”, that the mind/brain is very willing to change once it “knows” how, and that guided with skill and sensitivity, change provides an increased sense of control over ones’ life.

A powerful demonstration of these interactions by Baxter (1994) found that NLP reframing used to treat obsessive compulsive disorder in place of Prozac, resulted in the same raised serotonin levels and reduced caudate nucleus activity as control subjects who took medication (as measured by positron emission tomography, a type of neural imaging).

Systems view

People are complex adaptive (learning) systems and processes, and have a richness to them which no simple system can fully predict or capture. Our bodies, our societies, and our planet form an ecology of complex systems and sub-systems all of which interact with and mutually influence each other. “Intuitively obvious” results are not always to be expected. Positive and negative feedback, leverage points, interpretational context, and other features of complex systems will come into play. In humans, the body impacts on the mind, and the mind impacts on the body. Thought, emotional state, somatic awareness, perception, and body usage, as well as neurochemistry and other hormonal interactions, and external circumstances, are all profoundly interdependent and deeply connected, and any can influence or be influenced by another.

In NLP it is therefore seen as important not to make untested assumptions about individuals, that there are many more ways than the obvious to approach a seemingly intractable problem, it is understood there will usually be unconscious goals, limiting beliefs or secondary gains present in any situation, and that there is an art as well as a skill in perceiving how best to approach this. Change is also systemic. That is, it does not happen in a vacuum and is not limited to the “problem area”, but usually is connected to other aspects of life, which are part of the situation as well as a necessary part of any solution. Partly for this reason, NLP leaves deliberately open and unlimited, its areas of interest and its scope.

As a special case of systemic thinking, NLP emphasizes that change is relational. That is, change happens in a relational context, whether the self-relationship or the relationship with another person (parent, friend, partner, employer, co-worker, role model, clinician, trainer). Change happens in a relationship, and the quality of that relationship, known as rapport, is often critical to the ability to change.


Meaning and context in communication

NLP views meaning as only existing within a given context, a view known as cultural relativism which is axiomatic in anthropology. Because of this, NLP states The meaning of communication is the result you get – it is not message sent, but message received, and willingness to set aside preconceived interpretive frames, which is most significant in communication.

The process of interpreting “meaning” from thought and speech is complex and (as pointed out in sciences such as cognitive linguistics, transformational grammar and general semantics) can involve a wide range of distortions, errors, and mistranslations because internal experiences, thoughts and feelings have to be translated back and forth through conscious perceptual filters, into crude symbols known as ‘words’. The resulting patterns of speech are considered highly revealing of the unconscious perceptual filters involved.

NLP considers all behavior, at some level, communicative. Thus even undesired or clinical states such as depression and confusion have a structure, a purpose, and an underlying communication – or in other words, on their own terms, all mental states have a rational structure within their given context. Such states are often viewed by NLP not as problems, but as valuable resource states which are not being understood or acted upon, or a part of a person trying to grow or change, or which require a better ‘map’ of reality. NLP also considers much communication metaphorical, and that even its own tools can be philosophically interpreted as metaphors used to guide useful responses, rather than literal objective ‘truth statements’.


Form and content

In NLP, underlying subjective (perceived, cognitive) structure (“form”) matters more than specific situational “content”. The subjective structure of a perceived problem matters more than the situation in which it is embedded. This is an embodiment of the form/content distinction in philosophy, also favored by Western psychiatric medicine (an innovation first argued for by psychiatrists Karl Jaspers and Kurt Schneider), and is also a feature within cognitive linguistics.

NLP takes this principle into the field, with so-called “content free” work being a common respected NLP skill – that is, where no details of the situation are shared or sought, but only the cognitive features of how it is structured are relevant. Despite the practitioner lacking knowledge of the actual situation, knowledge of the structural aspects alone (modalities, strategies, outcome orientation and the like) are often sufficient by themselves to allow NLP to work with full effectiveness. Common rationales for working with reduced content in this manner are:

* The less content is involved, the more the practitioner is client- rather than self- or interpretation-focussed
* The less distraction (ie, loss of strategic focus) due to content is likely to arise.
* Other than perhaps for rapport purposes, the extra information is generally not very relevant to NLP’s strategic structural approach, so it is wasteful of time to dwell on it

NLP is in the present and oriented towards the future

No matter the personal history, the only memory of it is in the present neurology and life. The past has no existence independent of this. Therefore what is explored is the memory and impressions of events in the present – present experiences, present constructions, and present limits, including the present beliefs about their existence and origins. What is then aimed for is to build in the present, a changed future, where old, outdated, or dysfunctional beliefs and patterns are no longer an issue.

Common sayings (or principles)

The following are some of NLP’s most recognized principles and presuppositions, in their well known aphoristic forms. They are often summarized as soundbites so as to be short, pithy, and memorable, and a fuller discussion of these (as well as some of the other common NLP sayings) is given in Principles of NLP.

Perspectives:

* The map is not the territory
* People already have all the resources they need to succeed [or change]

Systemic view:


* Life and ‘Mind’ are systemic processes

Information and interpretation:

* Behind every behavior is a positive intention
* There is no failure, only feedback
* The meaning of your communication is the response you get
* Choice is better than no choice (and flexibility is the way one gets choice)
* Multiple descriptions are better than one
* There are no resistant clients; there are only incompetent [less skilled] therapists

Working approaches:

* If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you always got
(or: If what you are doing isn’t working, try something [anything] else)
* Good NLP is 90% information gathering and testing, and 10% changework
* Everyone is different
* Use whatever works
* If something can be done effectively and ecologically in ten minutes, don’t spend an hour doing it

All About Hair

Hair is a filamentous outgrowth of dead cells from skin, found only on mammals. It projects from the epidermis, though it grows from hair follicles deep in the dermis. Although many other life forms, especially insects, show filamentous outgrowths, these are not considered “hair” in the accepted meaning of the term. So-called “hairs” (trichomes) are also found on plants. The projections on arthropods, such as insects and spiders are actually insect bristles. The hair of non-human mammal species is commonly referred to as fur. There are varieties of cats, dogs, and mice bred to have little or no visible fur. In some species, hair is absent at certain stages of life.

The primary component of hair fiber is keratin. Keratins are proteins, long chains (polymers) of amino acids. Keratin proteins form the cytoskeleton (miniature skeleton within a cell) of all epidermal cells. Keratin filaments run within a cell from the inside of the outer membrane to weave a “basket” around the nucleus of the cell. Keratins are a principal part of the cells in the epidermis, hair, nails, and feathers.

 

Demodex is a genus of tiny parasitic mites which live in or near hair follicles of mammals.

 

 

Human hair

 

 

Body hair

 

 

Historically, several ideas have been advanced to describe the reduction of human body hair. All were faced with the same problem that there is no fossil record of human hair to back up the conjectures nor to determine exactly when the feature evolved.

 

Savanna theory suggests that nature selected humans for shorter and thinner body hair as part of a set of adaptations to the warm plains of the savanna, including bipedal locomotion and an upright posture. There are several problems with this theory, not least of which is that cursorial hunting is used by other animals that do not show any thinning of hair.

 

Another theory for the thin body hair on humans proposes that Fisherian runaway sexual selection played a role here (as well as in the selection of long head hair). Possibly this occurred in conjunction with neoteny, with the more juvenile appearing females being selected by males as more desirable; see types of hair and vellus hair.

 

The aquatic ape hypothesis posits that sparsity of hair is an adaptation to an aquatic environment, but it has little support amongst scientists and very few aquatic mammals are, in fact, hairless.

 

In reality, there may be little to explain. Humans, like all primates, are part of a trend toward sparser hair in larger animals; the density of human hair follicles on the skin is actually about what one would expect for an animal of equivalent size[1]. The outstanding question is why so much of human hair is short, underpigmented vellus hair rather than terminal hair.

 

 

Head hair

 

Young Girl Fixing her Hair, by Sophie Gengembre Anderson


Young Girl Fixing her Hair, by Sophie Gengembre Anderson

 

Head hair is a type of hair that is grown on the head (sometimes referring directly to the scalp).The most noticeable part of human hair is the hair on the head, which can grow longer than on most mammals and is more dense than most hair found elsewhere on the body. The average human head has about 100,000 hair follicles. Its absence is termed alopecia, commonly known as baldness. Anthropologists speculate that the functional significance of long head hair may be adornment, a by-product of secondary natural selection once other somatic hair had been lost. Another possibility is that long head hair is a result of Fisherian runaway sexual selection, where long lustrous hair is a visible marker for a healthy individual (with good nutrition, waist length hair—approximately 1 meter or 39 inches long—would take around 84 months, or about 7 years, to grow). Each follicle can grow about 20 individual hairs in a person’s lifetime. Average hair loss is about 100 strands a day. The average human scalp measures approximately 120 square inches (770 cm²). These values are also reported by Desmond Morris although it is not clear if these are applicable to both men and women.

 


Average number of head hairs (Caucasian)

 

color number of hairs diameter
Blonde 146,000 11500th to 1500th inch 17 to 51 micrometers
Black 110,000 1400th to 1250th inch 64 to 100 micrometers
Brunette 100,000 variable variable
Red 86,000 variable variable

 

Traditional Hopi hair style, photo by Edward S. Curtis, 1922


Traditional Hopi hair style, photo by Edward S. Curtis, 1922

 

 

Types of hair

 

Humans have three different types of hair:

 

  • Lanugo, the fine hair that covers nearly the entire body of fetuses
  • Vellus hair, the short, fine, “peach fuzz” body hair that grows in most places on the human body in both sexes
  • Terminal hair, the fully developed hair, which is generally longer, coarser, thicker, and darker than vellus hair.

 

 

Growth

 

Distribution of androgenic hair on female and male body


Distribution of androgenic hair on female and male body

 

Different parts of the human body feature different types of hair. From childhood onward, vellus hair covers the entire human body regardless of sex or race except in the following locations: the lips, the palms of hands, the soles of feet, certain external genital areas, the navelscar tissue. The density of the hairs (in hair follicles per square centimeter) varies from one person to another. and

 

The rising level of male hormones (androgens) during puberty causes a transformation process of vellus hair into terminal hair on several parts of the male body. The hair follicles respond to androgens, primarily testosterone and its derivatives; the hair in these locations can be thus termed androgenic hair. The rate of hair growth and the weight of the hairs increase. However, different areas respond with different sensitivities. As testosterone levels increase, the sequence of appearance of androgenic hair reflects the gradations of androgen sensitivity. The pubic area is most sensitive, and heavier hair usually grows there first in response to androgens.

 

Layers of an individual hair


Layers of an individual hair

 

Areas on the human body that develop terminal hair growth due to rising androgens in both sexes, men and women, are the underarms and the pubic area. In contrast, normally only men grow androgenic hair in other areas. There is a sexual dimorphism in the amount and distribution of androgenic hair, with males having more terminal hair (particularly facial hair, chest hair, abdominal hair and hair on legs and arms) and females having more vellus hair, which is less visible. The genetic disposition determines the sex-dependent and individual rising of androgens and therefore the development of androgenic hair.

 

Increased body hair on women following the male pattern can be referred to as hirsutism. An excessive and abnormal hair growth on the body of males and females is defined as hypertrichosis. Considering an individual occurrence of body hair as abnormal does not implicitly depend on medical indications but also on cultural and social attitudes.

 

Individual hairs alternate periods of growth and dormancy. During the growth portion of the cycle, hair follicles are long and bulbous, and the hair advances outward at about a third of a millimeter per day. After three to six months, body hair growth stops (the pubic and armpit areas having the longest growth period). The follicle shrinks and the root of the hair grows rigid. Following a period of dormancy, another growth cycle starts, and eventually a new hair pushes the old one out of the follicle from beneath. Head hair, by comparison, grows for a long duration and to a great length before being shed. The rate of growth is approximately 15 millimeters, or about ⅝ inch, per month.

 

Photo of Statue with curly hair


Photo of Statue with curly hair

 

 

Texture

 

Hair texture is measured by the degree of which one’s hair is either fine or coarse, which in turn varies according to the diameter of each individual hair. There are usually four major types of hair texture: fine, medium, coarse and wiry. Within the four texture ranges hair can also be thin, medium or thick density and it can be straight, curly, wavy or kinky. Hair conditioner will also alter the ultimate equation and can be healthy, normal, oily, dry, damaged or a combination. Hair can also be textured if straighteners, crimpers, curlers, etc are used to style hair. Also, an expert hairdresser can change the hair texture with the use of special chemicals.

 

Hair is genetically programmed to be straight, curly or wavy, and it tends to change over time.

 

For many years, it was believed that the shape of a person’s hair was determined by the individual hair shafts, and that curly hair was curly because the cross-section of the hair shaft was flatter and had more intertwined layers than straight hair, which was round. But scientists have determined that whether your hair is curly or straight is determined by the shape of the follicle itself and the direction in which each strand grows out of its follicle. Curly hair is shaped like an elongated oval and grows at a sharp angle to the scalp.

 

Curly hair has a different biological structure than straight hair. It tends to be much drier than straight hair because the oils secreted into the hair shaft by the sebaceous glands can more easily travel down the shaft of straight hair. People with curly hair should know that this hair type can be dry, hard to manage, and often frizzy.

 

Hair, whether it is curly or straight, is affected by the amount of humidity in the air. It serves as a “truth serum” for the air, forcing water back into the hair fiber and forcing hair shaft to return to its original structure. This may be more noticeable in somebody with curly hair because it tends to get frizzy when the humidity rises.

 

 

 

 

Aging

 

Older people tend to develop grey hair because the pigment in the hair is lost and the hair becomes colorless. Grey hair is considered to be a characteristic of normal aging. The age at which this occurs varies from person to person, but in general nearly everyone 75 years or older has grey hair, and in general men tend to become grey at younger ages than women.

 

It should be noted however, that grey hair in itself is not actually grey; the grey head of hair is a result of a combination of the dark and white/colorless hair forming an overall ‘grey’ appearance to the observer. As such, people starting out with very pale blond hair usually develop white hair instead of grey hair when aging. Red hair usually doesn’t turn grey with age; rather it becomes a sandy color and afterward turns white. In fact, the gray or white appearance of individual hair fibers is a result of light scattering from air bubbles in the central medula of the hair fiber. Some degree of scalp hair loss or thinning generally accompanies aging in both males and females, and it’s estimated that half of all men are affected by male pattern baldness by the time they are 50[3]. The tendency toward baldness is a trait shared by a number of other primate species, and is thought to have evolutionary roots.

 

It is commonly claimed that hair and nails will continue growing for several days after death. This is a myth; the appearance of growth is actually caused by the retraction of skin as the surrounding tissue dehydrates, making nails and hair more prominent.

 

 

Pathological impacts on hair

 

Drugs used in cancer chemotherapy frequently cause a temporary loss of hair, noticeable on the head and eyebrows, because they kill all rapidly dividing cells, not just the cancerous ones. Other diseases and traumas can cause temporary or permanent loss of hair, either generally or in patches.

 

The hair shafts may also store certain poisons for years, even decades, after death. In the case of Col. Lafayette Baker, who died July 3, 1868, use of an atomic absorption spectrophotometerarsenic. The prime suspect was Wally Pollack, Baker’s brother-in-law. According to Dr. Ray A. Neff, Pollack had laced Baker’s beer with it over a period of months, and a century or so later minute traces of arsenic showed up in the dead man’s hair. Mrs. Baker’s diary seems to confirm that it was indeed arsenic, as she writes of how she found some vials of it inside her brother’s suitcoat one day. showed the man was killed by white

 

 

Width

 

According to The Physics Factbook, the diameter of human hair ranges from 17 to 181 µm.

 

 

Cultural attitudes

 

 

Head hair

 

People from different cultures have invented various ways to arrange, or


People from different cultures have invented various ways to arrange, or “style,” their hair.

 

The remarkable head hair of humans has gained an important significance in nearly all present societies as well as any given historical period throughout the world. The haircut has always played a significant cultural and social role.

 

In ancient Egypt head hair was often shaved, especially amongst children, as long hair was uncomfortable in the heat. Children were often left with a long lock of hair growing from one part of their heads, the practice being so common that it became the standard in Egyptian art for artists to depict children as always wearing this “sidelock“. Many adult men and women kept their heads permanently shaved for comfort in the heat and to keep the head free of lice, while wearing a wig in public.

 

In ancient Greece and ancient Rome men and women already differed from each other through their haircuts. The head hair of women was long and pulled back into a chignon. Many dyed their hair red with henna and sprinkled it with gold powder, often adorning it with fresh flowers. Men’s hair was short and even occasionally shaved. In Rome hairdressing became ever more popular and the upper classes were attended to by slaves or visited public barber shops.

 

Maasai warriors with their traditional hair styling


Maasai warriors with their traditional hair styling

 


The traditional hair styling in some parts of Africa also gives interesting examples of how people dealt with their head hair. The Maasai warriors tied the front hair into sections of tiny braids while the back hair was allowed to grow to waist length. Women and non-warriors, however, shaved their heads. Many tribes dyed the hair with red earth and grease; some stiffened it with animal dung.

 

Contemporary social and cultural conditions have constantly influenced popular hair styles. From the 17th century into the early 19th century it was the norm in Western culture for men to have long hair often tied back into a ponytail. Famous long-haired men include René Descartes, Giacomo Casanova, Oliver Cromwell and George Washington. During his younger years Napoleon Bonaparte had a long and flamboyant head of hair. Before World War I men generally had longer hair and beards. The trench warfare between 1914 and 1918 exposed men to lice and flea infestations, which prompted the order to cut hair short, establishing a norm that has persisted.

 

It has also been advanced that short hair on men has been enforced as a means of control, as shown in the military and police and other forces that require obedience and discipline. Additionally, slaves and defeated armies were often required to shave their heads, in both pre-medieval Europe and China.

 

Long hair was almost universal among women in Western culture until World War I. Many women in conservative Pentecostal groups abstain from trimming their hair after conversion (and some have never had their hair trimmed or cut at all since birth). The social revolution of the 1960s led to a renaissance of unchecked hair growth. Hair length is measured from the front scalp line on the forehead up over the top of the head and down the back to the floor. Standard milestones in this process of hair growing are waist length, hip length, classic length (midpoint on the body, where the buttocks meet the thighs), thigh length, knee length, ankle length and even beyond. It takes about seven years, including occasional trims, to grow one’s hair to waist length. Terminal length varies from person to person according to genetics and overall health.

 

A thriving salon culture in Detroit gave rise to the Detroit Hair Wars in 1991. Using the medium of human and synthetic hair, elaborate fantastical head pieces, such as spider webs, flowers and flying “hair-y copters”, have been made by participants.

 

 

Body hair

 

Mark Twain, Shirtless. A human male with body hair.


Mark Twain, Shirtless. A human male with body hair.

 

The attitudes towards hair on the human body also vary between different cultures and times. In some cultures profuse chest hair on men is a symbol of virility and masculinity; other societies display a hairless body as a sign of youthfulness.

 

In ancient Egypt, people regarded a completely smooth, hairless body as the standard of beauty. An upper class Egyptian woman took great pains to ensure that she did not have a single hair on her body, except for the top of her head (and even this was often replaced with a wig). The ancient Greeks later adopted this smooth ideal, considering a hairless body to be representative of youth and beauty. This is reflected in Greek female sculptures which do not display any pubic hair. Islam stipulates many tenets with respect to hair, such as the covering of hair by women and the removal of armpit and pubic hair (see five physical characteristics traits of fitrah).

 

In Western societies it became a public trend during the late twentieth century, particularly for women, to reduce or to remove their body hair. The bikini and Brazilian waxing fashion as well as the sexual imagery in advertising and movies are major reasons for this development. This media trend began in the United States and is becoming ever more popular throughout other Western countries. It was also beginning to gain currency among men, among whom shaving or trimming one’s body hair is sometimes jokingly called “manscaping“.

 

 

Hair as business factor

 

Hair care for humans is a major world industry with specialized tools, chemicals and techniques. The business of various products connected with human hair has become an important industrial and financial factor in Western societies.

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